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Housing and climate resilience

We partner with communities across the Asia and Pacific region to identify those vulnerable to disasters and to increase local capacity to reduce disaster risks. Our aim is always to better respond and recover from them when they do happen.

Reducing the risks of disasters is a fundamental feature of Habitat for Humanity Australia’s work across the region, ensuring that any interventions are resilient and sustainable in high-risk disaster-prone areas. Habitat recognises that disasters and climate change have a disproportionate impact on the most vulnerable of communities and is inextricably linked to poverty and inequality.

Habitat recognises that disasters and climate change have a disproportionate impact on the most vulnerable of communities and is inextricably linked to poverty and inequality.

We work alongside communities in the Asia Pacific to increase their local capacity to reduce these disaster risks, and to better respond and recover from them when they occur. We increase local capacity for adaptation through community engagements such as the Participatory Approach for Safe Shelter Awareness (PASSA).

Reducing risks of disasters is a fundamental feature of Habitat for Humanity Australia’s work across the region, ensuring that any interventions are resilient and sustainable in high-risk disaster-prone areas. Improving housing, along with water security, WASH services and community capacity building is essential for improving resilience and adaptation to climate change.

So, how does the climate impact housing in the Pacific?

Increased natural disasters

Climate change leads to more frequent and severe natural disasters, such as hurricanes, floods, bushfires, and droughts. These events can destroy homes, infrastructure, and people’s livelihoods, pushing people deeper into poverty and worsening existing housing insecurity.

Changing environmental conditions

Climate change can alter the physical environment, making certain areas less suitable for habitation. Rising sea levels and coastal erosion can force people to abandon their homes and extreme heat can make housing without proper ventilation unbearable. Those who cannot afford to adapt or relocate may become trapped in housing that endangers their health, safety and overall wellbeing.

Climate-induced migration

Climate change can cause forced migration as it disrupts ecosystems, exacerbates resource scarcity, and increases the frequency of extreme weather events. The influx of climate refugees can also strain resources and infrastructure in receiving communities, potentially leading to housing shortages and increased competition for affordable housing options.

Limited access to sustainable resources

Climate change also disrupts the availability of essential resources like clean water, useable land, and reliable food sources. Unreliable water resources impact agriculture which communities rely on for both their food source and their livelihoods. Limited access to clean water and sanitation facilities can result in health issues and the spread of diseases – both of which further perpetuate poverty.

Our Impact Stories

Stories from overseas

image is taken from a birds eye perspective. A woman sits on the floor surrounded by bowls.
Meet Sahana: Building Resilience and Community in the Heart of Dhaka 
In the heart of northwest Dhaka, lies Duaripara, one of the largest informal settlements in the region. Here, amidst the maze of narrow alleys and tightly packed homes, a remarkable story of resilience…
Unlocking the Power of Corporate Volunteering Overseas: Building Homes in Partnership with Families in Need 
In recent years, corporate volunteering has emerged as a powerful tool for both social impact and employee engagement. One particularly impactful form of corporate volunteering is participating in overseas projects like our Global…
Meet Mrs Thuan
Life has not been kind to Mrs Thuan and her family. She lives in a degraded house in a southern Vietnamese province called Dong Thap, with her two children. Her husband suffered a…
Join our Global Village and Travel with Impact this year!
Impact travel is revolutionising the way we see the world and ourselves within it. Unlike traditional tourism, which often skirts around the edges of local communities, impact travel plunges you straight into the…
International Women’s Day Global Village, Q&A with a volunteer!
Deb recently joined Habitat for Humanity Australia on a Global Village in Siem Reap, Cambodia, for International Women's Day! Deb was one of 38 volunteers who fundraised and built four safe and secure…
Resilient Housing, WASH and Education: Here’s what we’ve been up to in Cambodia.
Habitat for Humanity Australia has been making significant strides in our international programs, particularly through our initiatives in Battambang Province, Cambodia. The program, aimed at empowering vulnerable communities to recover from disasters, climate…

Want to make a real difference in the world?

Global Village is the answer. Join us in our short-term international volunteer program to build and improve homes and futures for vulnerable communities overseas.

Habitat for Humanity Australia acknowledges the Traditional Owners of the country on which we work, the peoples of the Eora Nation, and recognise their continuing connection to land, water, and culture. We pay our respects to their Elders past, present and emerging. We respectfully acknowledge the traditional owners of the lands and waters of Australia. 

We are endorsed by the Australian Taxation Office as a Deductible Gift Recipient with charity status. Donations of $2 or more are tax deductible. Habitat for Humanity is accredited by the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), responsible for managing the Australian Government’s development program. Habitat for Humanity Australia receives support through the Australian NGO Cooperation Program (ANCP).

Habitat For Humanity Australia ABN: 29 131 976 004
Habitat for Humanity Australia Overseas Aid Fund ABN: 36 747 459 174
Habitat for Humanity Australia – copyright 2024